Between 2015 and 2017 £350 million has been given to northern Iraq, however little if anything has ended up with the people

The EU has delivered just over £350 million to the Yazidis in northern Iraq, who, has a group, have been brutally treated at the hands of Islamic State.

However very little if any actually ends up helping the intended people.

The damning claims, made by an NGO who worked in northern Iraq, were revealed in an interview this week.

But Nadia’s Initiative, an NGO named after an enslaved Yezhidi girl who managed to escape the Islamic State, says little if anything ends up helping the discriminated community in Sinjar, an ancient city in northern Iraq.

‘No aid’

Elizabeth Schaeffer Brown, who has been working with the community since 2015, told this website Iraqi politicians are now refusing to disperse any of the needed aid funds to the area in and around Sinjar.

“There is no aid, there is no reconstruction, there are landmines and mass graves and political disputes and reconstruction can’t begin because Sinjar hasn’t been de-mined,” she said, last month in an interview.

Brown, who had also helped mount a case of genocide against the Islamic State at the International Criminal Court in the Hague, says Iraqi government forces to drive out the militants have made it somewhat safer for the Yazidis to return home.

“Now we need the Iraqi government to hire the Yazidis and make them part of the security. I think that is a very concrete action that I think the Iraqi government and international community can support,” she said.

The EU maintains humanitarian funding is going to Ninewa governorate, where Sinjar town is located, to assist vulnerable people, including Yazidis. The funding apparently goes towards health care, education in emergencies, as well as assistance in response to flooding in Sinjar.

‘Don’t care about the Yazidis’

But Brown says the money is not reaching the people because local political authorities “don’t really care about the Yazidi population”.

Caritas, an international aid organisation, is now promoting Nadia’s Initiative to help bring some solutions, says most of the EU funding is going to Mosul, Telfar, and Hawija in west Anbar.

“It is another sign how the system is failing when the community of victims is responsible of ensuring that justice prevails,” said Shannon Pfohman, a policy and advocacy director for Caritas Europa.