As we near the end, we’re still no closer to knowing how this story finishes.

Theresa May’s Withdrawal Agreement is as dead as her previous Chequers Proposal, and the likelihood of a no deal Brexit seems more likely by the day.

One thing that is certain however, is the split between the economic reality facing EU members and the politicking that the EU itself is engaged with.

On Tuesday evening, as the historic defeat in the Commons was confirmed, the German Foreign Minister gave an impassioned speech to his colleagues, urging them to get the UK round the table oncemore, in order to defend German industry.

Mr Maas told to German MPs in the Bundestag: “In the coming days and weeks, we will do everything we can so that Britain exits with and not without an agreement.”

This sentiment was echoed across European parliaments, as the economic reality of Brexit took hold within the corridors of power across the continent.

If a deal is impossible, and no one wants no deal, then who will finally have the courage to say what the only positive solution is?

— Donald Tusk (@eucopresident) January 15, 2019

However, Tusk, Juncker et al, are not elected from any particular country; the job they have is to serve the EU as a collective, almost federal-like being.  Politically, they need the UK to suffer, to be divided, in order to appear strong and unified as well as scaring off other nations from following suit.

Something will have to give.

The UK runs a trade deficit with the EU; meaning, in brute economic terms, the EU needs the UK that little bit more than the UK needs the EU.  That’s why the sensible ministers across parliaments are calling for better terms for the UK, they need a happy UK in order to carry on being economically strong.

Something which would not be in the interests of the EU.

However, Tusk, Juncker et al, are not elected from any particular country; the job they have is to serve the EU as a collective, almost federal-like being.  Politically, they need the UK to suffer, to be divided, in order to appear strong and unified as well as scaring off other nations from following suit.

Something which would not be in the interests of the EU.

Something will have to give and it may well come down to the old adage: ‘it’s the economy, stupid.’